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Ha(a)ïtza 2016 - Haïtza

Ha(a)ïtza 2016

Driven by the desire to preserve and revive the spirit of the place, Sophie and William Techoueyres wished to give a new lease of life to Ha(a)ïtza, with that something special that makes their strength and success : a perfect blend of simplicity, intimacy and elegance.

Their objective : is to reawaken the hotel’s panache of yesteryears, to welcome their friends and let them discover the lifestyle and the charms of this region that they adore.

Already behind the revival of the Hotel La Co(o)rniche, they gave a second wind to Ha(a)ïtza, thanks to a complete rehabilitation by Philippe Starck, they can continue building history on the banks of the Bay.

Philippe Starck imagined Ha(a)ïtza as a paradox : from the weight of a Rock arise fantasy worlds emerging from our collective imaginations.
The historical building is a gateway to areas with distinctive features that are unveiled to the guest and by the guest. In an elegant eclecticism, Ha(a)ïtza is a series of abstractions, of spaces only dreamed of.

From the fertile ground offered by the region, Starck retained the sand of the ‘Dune du Pyla’ as one of the constituent elements of the site. Organic and mineral, solid and moving, the paradoxical nature of sand is at the foundation of the imaginary of the place. It is the link between the outdoors and indoors, anchoring the hotel to its region, inviting to travel to otherworldliness, to known or unknown lands.

‘Terra incognita’ is found in the phantasmagorical universe of the Grand Salon. A fascinating realm, a bourgeois living room in which family photos and objects stand alongside memories of trips in Africa.

The sensation of change of scenery is emphasized by the deliberately radical transition between the different public areas. Thus, the Grand Salon, this odd trophy room in which the mirage of an old lieutenant-colonel could appear, opens onto an immaculate reception which minimalism reminds New York’s modern art galleries.